Please post three images (make sure the images are JPEG, lined up on the left side, and about the size of the example images.
Post the captions for the images and the notes from pages 95-97 & 647-650.


Student Name
3 Images
Captions for images
Notes from pgs. 95-97 & 647-650.
Fakey McExample
03_05.jpg
03_02.jpg
03_11.jpg
The first image shows two different
models of an atom. Both models
contain a nucleus with electrons
surrounding the nucleus, where
positively charded particles
called protons and neutral
"charged" particles called
neutrons can be found.

The second image shows quartz crystals,
which are made of silicon-oxygen tetrahedron
joined in a 3-d network.

This chart shows the relative sizes
and ionic charges of various cations
and anions commonly found in
minerals.
This is the place where you put all the cool things you learned about minerals after you read pages
87-95. Put main ideas, definitions, things you
didn't know and things that you think are important
things to know about minerals
Dwight Alaba

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Sami Allam
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Woo Byun
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Tracy Catallo
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Kassey Dann
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Rashid Haddad
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Mohammad Jawad
File:BauxiteUSGOV.jpg
File:BauxiteUSGOV.jpg

File:Placermine.jpg
File:Placermine.jpg

File:Magnetite Russia.jpg
File:Magnetite Russia.jpg

Bauxite is the most important aluminum ore. It consists
largely of the minerals gibbsite Al(OH)3, bohemite γ-AlO(OH),
and diaspore α-AlO(OH), together with the iron oxides
goethite and hematite, the clay mineral kaolinite and small
amounts of anatase TiO2.

Placers supplied most of the gold for a large part of the
ancient world. Hydraulic mining methods such as hushing
were used widely by the Romans across their empire, but
especially in the gold fields of northern Spain after its
conquest by Augustus in 25 BC.

Magnetite is an oxide and is an important ore of iron.
Pg 95-97
Important Nonsilicate Minerals

- They are divided into classes, based on the anion(negatively charge ion) or complex anion that the members have in common.

- Minerals in each group have a similar physical property that are useful in mineral identification.

- Common Nonsilicate Minerals Carbonates, Halides, Oxides Sulfides,sulfates, and Native elements (single elements).
Pg 647-650
-secondary enrichment - weathering creates many important mineral deposits by concentraring minor amounts of metal that are scattered through unweathered rock into economically valuable concentrations.

Bauxite - forms in tropical climates.
Nonmetallic mineral resources - minerals that are not used as fuels or processed for the metals they contain.

Placers - are deposits formed when heavy minerals are mechanically concentrated by currents.

- Placers associated with streams are among the most common and best known, but the sorting action of waves can also create placers along the shores.
Industrial Materials - Fertilizers, sulfur,salt.
Peter Kin
placer_gold.jpg

australian_sapphires.jpg

Bauxite.jpg
-This is a picture of a gold placer they used to gather
minerals from the streams.

-2nd picture is a Australian sapphire showing variation
in cuts and color.

-3rd picture is:Bauxite which is a principal ore of
aluminum is important of ore created as a
enrichment by weathering process

Notes:
  • Nonsilicate minerals: they are subdivided into classes based on their anion or complex anions, the members are common to one another.
  • Most common nonsilicate minerals belong to one of the three classes of minerals known as the carbonates.
  • Limestone: when calcite is the dominant mineral.
  • Dolostone results from predominance of dolomite.
  • Mineral: naturally occurring inorganic solid with orderly crystalline structure.
  • Building blocks of minerals are called elements.
  • Atoms combine with each other to form more complex substances: compounds.
  • Secondary enrichment takes place in two ways.
  • Chemical weathering coupled with downward percolating water removes materials from decomposing rock.
  • Reverse of the first. Desirable elements are found in low concentrations.
  • Bauxite: Principal ore of aluminum is important of ore created as a enrichment by weathering process.
  • Placers: deposits formed when heavy minerals are mechanically concentrated by currents.
  • Nonmetallic mineral resources are the non used fuels or processed metals that contain them.
  • Building materials are crushed stone, sand and gravel.
  • Fertilizers: Important to agriculture.
  • Sulfur: An important nonmetallic resource.
  • Salt: Halite, another important versatile resource.
Michelle Kloda
images.jpg

imagesCA90X3ZT.jpg

imagesCAU80OUS.jpg
The first image shows salt , also known as
halite tat is and important resource.

The second image shows Wollastonite, a mineral bestowed with many unique characteristics, is one of the most versatile functional filler and reinforcement agent.

The third image shows gypsum, found in nature in mineral and rock form.
nonsilcate minerals are subdivided into classes based on oxides
negative oxygen-bonded to one or more kinds of positive ions
only about 8 percent of earth's crust
three classes of minerals- carbonates, halides, sulfates
minerals fuond in sedimentary rocks are called halite and gypsum
gypsum, which is a calcium sulfate with water bound into the structure,is the mineral of which plaster and other similar building materials are composed
secondary enrichment-concentration of minor amounts of metals that are scattered through unweathered rock into economically valuable concentrations by weathering processes
bauxite-principal form of aluminum is one important example of an ore created as a result of enrichment by weathering processes
pyrite is important because when it chemically wetahers, sulfuric acid forms which enables percolating waters to dessolve the ore metals
placers- deposits formed when heavy minerals are mechanically concentrated by currents
nonmetallic mineral resources-Earths matericals that are not used as fuels aor processed for the metals they contain
nonmetallics are used up in the process of creating other products
nonmetallic mineral resources are divided into two broad groups- building minerals and industrial minerals
fertilizers are extremly imporatnt to agriculture
more than 80 percent of sulfur is used to produce sulfuric
acid
salt is used as a raw mineral in the chemical industry
used to soften water and to keep streets and highways free of ice and also a basic nutrient and part of many food products
Max Lewis
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Carlos Martinez
external image graphite.jpg
external image 6fluorite-douglass95.jpg
external image muscovite.jpg
The first image shows a picture of Graphite, which is important mineral that's used for pencil lead, and lubricants.

The second image show Fluorite which is very important, since it's used for steel making; we probably wouldnt be able to do much without this mineral.

The third image is Mucovite and it's used as an insulator, material that resist eletrical flow, in eletrical applications.
Non silicate minerals are divided inot classes based on anion, which are negatively charged ions, that are in common.Minerals in each group have similar physica properties.Non silicates make up 8 percent of Earth's crust.The building blocks of minerals are elements. Wheathering creates many important mineral deposits.Secondary enrichment takes places in two diffrent ways.Bauxite forms in rainy tropical climates.Bauxite is also known as aluminum laterites.Deposits of of nickel and colbat are also found in laterite soils that develop form igneous rocks .Pyrite is the most important mineral when it is chemically wheather.Placers are deposits formed when heavey minerals are mechanically concetrated.Placerss usually involve minerals that aren't only heavy, but durable and chemically resistant.Earth's material that aren't used for fuel or processed for fuels are known as non-metalic mineral resources.Non-metalic mineral resoucers are extracted and processd for non metalic elements they contain or physical and properties they possess.The quanities of nonmetalic minerals used up each year are ernourmouse.Non-metalic minerals resources are divided into two groups; building materials, or industrial material.Economic worths for building material only comes when the mineral is removed from the ground.Many nonmetalic resources are classified as industrial minerals.
Adriana
Monyoya
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Andrew Phillips
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Rendell Pineda
bauxite.jpg
Magnetite.jpg
highway.jpg
This picture is of bauxite, it is the ore of aluminum and from as a result of weathering processes under tropical conditions. Colors vary.

This picture is of magnetite. Magnetite is an oxide and is an important ore of iron.

This picture is of a highway. Crushed stone, sand, and gravel are used for aggregate in the construction industry.
  • Nonsilicate minerals are typically subdived into classes
  • Based on the anion or complex anion that the members have in common
  • Nonsilicates make up only about 8 percent of earth's crust
  • Common nonsilicate minerals are carbonates
  • Halite and gypsum are frequently found in sedimentary rocks
  • Mineral classes
    • Carbonates
    • Halides
    • Oxides
    • Sulfides
    • Sulfates
    • Native elements
  • Secondary enrichment is a transformation where weathering creates many important mineral deposits by concentrating amounts of metals through unweathered rock
  • Bauxite is principle ore of aluminum
  • Copper and silver deposits result when weathering processes concentrate metals that are deposited through low grade primary ore
  • Placers are deposits formed when heavy minerals are mechanically concentrated by currents
  • Nonmetallic mineral resources are earth materials not used as fuels or processed for the metals they contain
Antonette Puleo
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Liliana Rzepecka
external image placermodel.jpe
external image Calcite.jpg
external image widmanstatten.jpg
Gold is created in the deposits in the mountains and it flows down the river, and that is how people find it.

This image shows the nonsilicate mineral calcite.

It is an example of a nonmetallic meteroite made of iron.
Important Nonsilicate Minerals
  • Nonsilicate minerals are typically subdivided into classes based on the anion or complex anion that the members have in common
  • Nonsilicates make up about 8% of Earth’s crust
  • The two most common carbonate minerals are calcite and dolomite
  • Calcite and dolomite are usually found together as the primary constituents in the sedimentary rocks limestone and dolostone
  • Two other nonsilicate minerals frequently found in sedimentary rocks are halite and gypsum
Weathering and Ore Deposits
  • Secondary enrichment- the concentration of minor amounts of metal that are scattered through unweathered rock into economically valuable concentrations by weathering process
  • The formation of bauxite, the principal ore of aluminum, is one important example of an ore created as a result of enrichment by weathering processes.
  • Bauxite forms in rainy tropical climates in association with laterites
Placer Deposits
  • Placers-deposit formed when heavy minerals are mechanically concentrated by currents, most commonly streams and waves. Placers are sources of gold, tin, platinum, diamonds, and other valuable minerals
  • Placers deposits usually involve minerals that are not only heavy but also durable and chemically resistant
  • Gold and other heavy durable minerals form placers
Nonmetallic Mineral Resources
  • Nonmetallic mineral resources- a mineral resource that is not a fuel or processed for the metals it contains
  • Natural aggregate consists of crushed stone, sand, and gravel
  • Fertilizers—primarily nitrate, phosphate, and potassium compounds—are extremely important to agriculture
  • Sulfur is very important because from it sulfuric acid is produced and it is used phosphate fertilizer
  • Common salt, known by the mineral halite is another important resource, because it is a part of many food products






Lisa Zarembski
calcite-marble-85.jpg

sulfur1.jpg

graphite-schist-169-a.jpg
Calcite is a nonmetallic mineral used in aggregation, steel making, and cement. It can be found in sedimentary deposits.

Sulfur is a nonmetallic mineral used in chemicals such as fertilizers. It is commonly found sedimentary deposits and hydorthermal deposits.

Graphite is a nonmetallic mineral used for pencil lead and lubricant. It can be found in metamorphic deposits.

Notes p.95-97, 647-650
  • Nonsilicate minerals are divided into classes.
  • classes based on the anion or complex anion that they have in common.
  • oxides and sulfides are prized for economic value.
  • weathering can create mineral deposits ex: Bauxite
  • many copper and silver deposits result from weathering processes
  • placers-deposits formed when heavy minerals are mechanically concentrated by currents
I would expect a few more notes here
Olena Yousif
Is your posting below?


Pages 95-97
  • Nonsilicate minerals are usually divided into classes based on the anion that the members have in common.
  • Most common nonsilicate minerals belong to the carbonates, the sulfates, and the halides.
  • 2 other nonsilicate minerals frequently found in sedimentary rocks are halite and gypsum.
  • Gemstones; the precious stones that has been prized since antiquity.
  • Naming gemstones, there the most precious stones that are given names that are different from their parent mineral.
  • When corundum exhibits a red hue its called ruby
  • Gems must be cut and polished by experienced professionals before their true beauty is displayed.
  • The majority of nonsilicate mineral classes contain members that are prized for their economic value.

Pages 647-650

  • Weathering creates many important mineral deposits by concentrating minor amounts of metals which is scattered through unweathered rock from economically valuable concentrations.
  • The concentration of minor amounts of metals that are scattered through unweathered rock into economically valuable concentrations by weathering process.
  • The formation of bauxite is the important example of an ore created as a result of enrichment by weathering action.
  • Bauxite forms in rainy tropical climates in association with laterites.
  • Placers: deposits formed when heavy minerals are mechanically concentrated by currents.
  • Heavy and durable minerals also gold form placers
  • Nonmetallic mineral resources: earth material that are not used as fuels or processed for the metals they contain.
  • The United States produces about 2 billion tons of aggregate per year which represents about one half of the entire nonenergy mining volume in the country.
  • Industrial Minerals fertilizers, salit, sulfure are all important because they are sources of specific chemical elements or compounds.
sulfur.jpgSulfur has a very low thermal conductivity meaning it cannot transfer heat very well. The touch of a hand will cause a sulfur crystal to crack because the crystal’s surface warms faster than the interior.
fig3.jpg

water cannons were used to break down the gold-bearing gravel deposits with tremendous volumes of water under high pressure.
opals_main.jpgOpal is the only gemstone that holds all colours of the spectrum. It is more rare than diamond - it is the Queen of Gems.